2015 log (9)

(1 Sep) A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984, Wes Craven) 86
[ Reviewed on Extra Beurre ]

(2 Sep) Listen to Me Marlon (2015, Stevan Riley)
[ Reviewed on Extra Beurre ]

(3 Sep) Paul à Québec (2015, François Bouvier) 61
[ Reviewed on Extra Beurre ]

(5 Sep) Mad Max: Fury Road (2015, George Miller) 95
[ Reviewed on Extra Beurre ]

(6 Sep) 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968, Stanley Kubrick) 94
[ Reviewed on Extra Beurre ]

(9 Sep) The Act of Killing (2012, Joshua Oppenheimer)
[ In 1965, the Indonesian military overthrew the governement and, with the help of paramilitaries and gangsters, proceeded to murder over a million so-called communists. They are still in power, incredibly enough. Worse, those evil motherfuckers are often shameless, proud even of all the people they kid. Filmmaker Joshua Oppenheimer somehow found that they were eager to not only tell stories about that ear, but that they were even willing to reenact them, movie-loving psychos that they are. This leads to some deeply disturbing scenes, pierced with unlikely humor and odd beauty… In addition to hearing about the genocide, we see that Indonesia is still seemingly completely corrupted and it’s hard to believe no one does anything about it. ]

(10 Sep) The Visit (2015, M. Night Shyamalan) 68
[ Reviewed on Extra Beurre ]

(11 Sep) Des jeunes gens mödernes (2014, Jean-François Sanz)
[ Reviewed on Extra Beurre ]

(12 Sep) The Social Network (2010, David Fincher) [ review ] 92

(13 Sep) The Cockpit (2014, Sho Miyake)
[ Reviewed on Extra Beurre ]

(13 Sep) The Fast and the Furious (2001, Rob Cohen) [ review ] 73

(14 Sep) Clouds of Sils Maria (2015, Olivier Assayas) 76
[ Presented in competition at Cannes and having won the Prix Louis-Delluc in 2014, “Clouds of Sils Maria” follows French actress Maria Enders (Juliette Binoche) and her American assistant Valentine (Kristen Stewart) on their way to Switzerland for a tribute to Maria’s mentor. Through intelligent writing and mise en scène, writer-director Olivier Assayas gradually lets us get to know the two women in a very natural way, as a few phone calls change the nature of the situation. It’s all quite captivating, in part because it deals with the film/theater industry, dropping references to “X-Men” movies and Lindsay Lohan as well as to projects, directors and stars made up by Assayas. Divided into chapters, the story eventually moves on to Maria working on a new version of a play she starred in at 18, about a young girl driving her 40 year old lesbian lover to suicide; Maria will now play the older woman, with Hollywood enfant terrible Jo-Ann Ellis (Chloë Grace Moretz) playing the teenager. Maria runs hers lines with Valentine, which leads to a series of absolutely genius scenes in which the lines are blurred between fiction and reality, with these two great actresses (yes, Stewart is great here) playing actresses (well, an actress and an assistant) who are acting out lines from a play that often seem to oddly mirror their own relationship… It’s truly fascinating, yet it’s ultimately not that huge a part of the film. The epilogue, for one, kinda let me down, save for delicious moment of cruelty delivered by Moretz. Still, it’s well worth seeing for those Binoche/Stewart scenes. ]

(15 Sep) Orion: The Man Who Would Be King (2015, Jeanie Finlay)
[ Reviewed on Extra Beurre ]

(17 Sep) The Reflektor Tapes (2015, Kahlil Joseph)
[ Reviewed on Extra Beurre ]

(18 Sep) Showgirls (1995, Paul Verhoeven) [ review ] 69

(22 Sep) The Green Inferno (2015, Eli Roth) 62
[ Reviewed on Extra Beurre ]

(23 Sep) Sicario (2015, Denis Villeneuve) 91
[ Reviewed on Extra Beurre ]

(30 Sep) The Walk (2015, Robert Zemeckis) 88
[ Reviewed on Extra Beurre ]

August / October