Orange County


Shaun Brumder (Colin Hanks) is not happy with his station in life. Well, Orange County used to please him just fine, with its sandy beaches and rolling waves where he partied and surfed day and night with his friends, but since he’s had his calling. Reading a novel by Marcus Skinner (Kevin Kline) inspired him so much that he vowed to become a writer himself. His dream became to be able to go to Stanford University to study under Skinner, and at the same time escape his ever kookier home life. He’s pretty tired of being caught between his divorced parents, whether it’s his drunken drama queen of a mom (Catherine O’Hara), who’s remarried with a crippled rich old man, or his self-centered dad (John Lithgow), who’s shacking up with a 20 year old bimbo (Leslie Mann), And it’s not his drugged out slacker of a brother (Jack Black) who’s gonna help him lose his blues. Unfortunately, his frustratingly incompetent guidance counsellor (Lily Tomlin) sent the wrong file to the Admissions department, and Shaun was rejected in spite of his high grades. Yet he’s not ready to give up, and with the help of his loyal girlfriend (Schuyler Fisk), he’ll do whatever he can to not let his dream escape him…

“Orange County” is a good but unexceptional little comedy most notable for its stellar cast. Every other bit part is played by a well known and liked actor, including Jane Adams from “Happiness”, washed out ‘comic’ Chevy Chase, Ben Stiller or directors Gary Marshall and Harold Ramis. At the centre of it all are the young couple, played by a pair of second generation young stars. Colin Hanks, like his father, evokes decency and sensibility, and he’s a pretty funny and likable performer who carries the film with apparent ease. Schuyler Fisk, daughter to Sissy Spacek, supports him nicely as his animal freak, girl-next-door love interest. And then there’s Jack Black… Oh, that dude has got to be the most welcomed comic find of the last few years. Of course, he’s at his best fronting the greatest band in the world, Tenacious D, but he also keeps livening up movies with his rugged charisma and in-your-face attitude. Here, his Lance is a marvel to be seen, always partying or partied out, a real shaggy, fat, vulgar, perpetually high mess of a guy who somehow manages to reveal a big heart and unexpected charm.

The film was directed by Jake Kasdan, a Hollywood brat himself (his old man is Lawrence Kasdan, who directed “The Big Chill”). I loved his debut “Zero Effect” but this time around it’s as if he just puts this and that good actor together and leaves them room to do their thing, without giving the film a clear drive. Maybe it’s the script by Mike White (who wrote and starred in the disturbing “Chuck & Buck”) which is to blame. It holds up well enough, with interesting and/or amusing ideas and characters here and there, and in theory, the way it shies away from the anything-for-a-laugh thinking of most teen comedies is admirable. Then again, as I watched the movie, I kind of wished it traded some of its pathos for being half as funny as an “American Pie” or a “Road Trip”. Because, while it means well in wanting to be about writing and inspiration, about the meaning of family and whatnot, White’s script ends up falling quite short of its ambitions and it can’t deliver anything deeper than a “Wizard of Oz”-like ‘there’s no place like home’ lesson. “Wonder Boys” this isn’t.

What’s more disorienting is that in its early scenes, the film works so hard at making us understand Shaun for wanting to leave the people around him that it becomes a caricature, but then we’re supposed to accept how everyone tones down the hysterics to give the movie a forced way-too-happy ending? “Orange County” is pleasant enough to watch, with a few hilarious Jack Black moments, and it makes you want to see more of Hanks and Fisk, but overall it just isn’t all that memorable. Worth a rental.