The Great Gatsby


I’m a huge fan of Baz Luhrmann, particularly of his “Moulin Rouge!”, which is just about my favorite movie of all time. So it was a delight and a thrill to catch his latest, especially since it features everything I love about his cinema, at least at first.

Adapted of course from the classic F. Scott Fitzerald novel, it bring us back to the Roaring Twenties, at a time when Wall Street was booming, people were getting rich and everyone was seemingly partying it up, especially in and around New York.

Tobey Maguire plays a naïve, innocent newcomer to this world, not unlike Christian in “Moulin Rouge!”, and like that character, he’s tempted early on into taking part in the decadence of his surroundings. You see, he happens to now be living next door to the titular Gatsby (Leonardo DiCaprio), a mysterious man who lives in a spectacular palace where he hosts equally spectacular soirées every weekend.

The scenes depicting this are wildly entertaining and filled with all things Baz: dizzying cinematography and editing (in 3D!), gorgeous art direction, plus breathless storytelling that blends history with pure fantasy… It’s the past and the future at the same time, the film is both modern and gloriously old-fashioned, meticulously recreating the period while using all kinds of 21st century tricks and special effects… Everything is wonderfully choreographed, we swing along in an overdose of glamour and luxury, to the sounds of jazz music mixed with hip hop… “It’s like an amusement park!” Exactly.

But then, maybe halfway into it, the party slows down and “The Great Gatsby” becomes more about the specifics of the plot. Gatsby, we discover, has made himself into a man of wealth and fame all in the hope of winning back the love of his life, Daisy (Carey Mulligan), who lives across the bay and is married to a rich heir (Joel Edgerton) who shamelessly cheats on her…

What happens to them is interesting and eventually grows into a veritable romantic tragedy, but I can’t say it involved or moved me as much as I wish it did. Ultimately, I found myself missing the tremendously enjoyable audiovisual extravaganza of the first half. I still liked the film a great deal, even though it feels a bit unbalanced. Oh well, that’s okay, Baz, we’ll always have “Moulin Rouge!”.