The Hunger Games


In this adaptation of the first book in Suzanne Collins’ bestselling trilogy, Oscar nominee (and “X-Men: First Class” alumnus!) Jennifer Lawrence stars as a 16-year-old girl living in a dystopian future where 24 teenagers are rounded up each year and forced to kill or be killed as part of a government-run televised reality show.

Not that original a concept (see also: “The Running Man,” “Battle Royale,” “The Condemned,” etc.), but thanks to confident storytelling, lively and expressive direction from Gary Ross, a potent mix of down-to-earth realism and sci-fi glam, a great score by James Newton Howard, a fun supporting cast (Woody Harrelson, Elizabeth Banks, Lenny Kravitz, Stanley Tucci, Donald Sutherland, Toby Jones) and, most of all, an immensely involving, alternately strong and vulnerable performance by the aforementioned Jennifer Lawrence, “The Hunger Games” entertains, fascinates and disturbs nonetheless.

Cause even though this isn’t as brutal as, say, “Battle Royale,” it’s still surprisingly bloody and ruthless for a young-adult-oriented Hollywood franchise.

The action is a bit too frantically shot/edited and there are a few narrative cheats in my opinion, but for the most part this is a pretty damn solid flick. Bonus points for actually telling a whole story, with an ending that’s only slightly, subtly open.